More information

Oyster, Pacific

Quality mark Cultivation
/Keurmerk Wild
Green
Second choice
Avoid
Bycatch
Informatie over vissoort
Lees meer
General

Shellfish

Shellfish is a culinary term that is often used for several species of molluscs, gastropods, bivalves and arthropods. Some examples are the St. James shell, mussels, razor clams, oysters, cockles and whelks. Most shellfish live partly or fully buried into the seabed, mostly in sandy or gravelly bottoms. They feed by filtering nutrients out of the water. Seed and eggs are released into the water and fertilized externally. Most shellfish are hermaphroditic, they can be both male and female. There are many different shellfish species in the North Sea that are very much suitable for consumption. Fishing methods on shellfish include hand-picking, dredging or mechanic dredges (suckers).

 

Oyster, Pacific

Both the endemic flat oyster and the exotic Pacific oyster are farmed and fished in the Netherlands. The Pacific oysters was introduced after the endemic oyster disappeared in the 60’s due to overfishing and disease. The Pacific oyster quickly spread across north-western Europe and formed reefs in many places. The Pacific oyster is often sold under ‘creuse’ on the Dutch market.  

Oyster, Pacific

Crassostrea gigas
Origin

Europe, inland waters
Deelgebieden: Grevelingen

Farming- / Catch method

Bottom culture

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Explanation assessment

In februari 2013 the Dutch oysterfishery in the Grevelingen and the Oosterschelde received MSC-certification. Despite the fact it is aquaculture, the MSC standard for sustainably caught fish was still applicable. That is because it is a form of aquaculture in which almost the whole process takes place in the wild and in a natural, uncontrolled manner.

The Dutch oyster fishery has received the MSC certificate after an independent team of scientists had established that the fishery and cultivation are carried out in such a controlled manner that there is no overfishing and that undesirable effects on life in and around the sea are limited to an absolute minimum.

 

Oyster, Pacific

Crassostrea gigas
Origin

Atlantic Ocean, north-east (FAO 27)

Farming- / Catch method

Bottom culture, Hangculture

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Source usage
Impact on the environment
Management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

The indigenous European flat oyster fishery and farming was doing very badly in Europe in the 60’s, due to overfishing and the oyster disease. Following this, the Pacific oyster was introduced in many places as an alternative for the oyster farmers. The Pacific oyster developed to a pest in almost all of north-west Europe, and outcompeted the indigenous shellfish at many places. With the introduction of the oysters, also other exotic animals and diseases were introduced.

The farming of oysters is done with several methods. Oyster larvae are farmed in hatcheries or caught in the water with specialised collectors. The oysters are often not farmed directly on the seabed. In the intertidal the oysters are often farmed in meshed bags on frames. At places that are always under water the oysters are farmed in crates or on ropes that hang in the water on floaters. These methods cause little disturbance to the environment. Oysters filter their food (algae) from the water and therefore do not need extra food. The Netherlands is one of the few countries where the oysters on the bottom are farmed on reserved oyster plots. This not only causes extra disturbance of the seabed, the oysters are also more vulnerable to diseases and predators.

There is nothing more to do about the invasion of the Pacific oyster. We can however prevent that diseases, parasites and other exotic animals can spread more by strict supervision and the restriction of transport of oysters between different areas. The European oyster culture is managed well, but often takes place in vulnerable areas.

 

ASC label

Fish with the ASC label is farmed in a sustainable manner.

MSC label

Fish with the MSC label is caught sustainably.

Good fish

This fish is not being overfished or is being responsibly farmed, with minimal impact on the environment.

Second choice

This fish is a second choice. There are still some improvements to be made in this fishery or fish farm.

Avoid

Do not buy this fish. It's being overfished or the way it's farmed or caught has a negative impact on the environment.

By-catch

This fish is unwillingly caught while fishing for a different species. They are underused and should be eaten more.

GlobalG.A.P.

GlobalG.A.P. certified farms are doing a step in the right direction in terms of sustainability. A few species with this label are getting a better score on the VISwijzer.

Organic

Organic standards are the strictest when it comes to fish feed. They also require certain measures for animal well-being.

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