More information

Yellowtail kingfish

Quality mark Cultivation
/Keurmerk Wild
Green
Second choice
Avoid
Bycatch
Informatie over vissoort
Lees meer
General

Mackerel-like fish

Mackerel-like (Scrombodei) from a subspecies of the Perciformes, the biggest order of fish. Mackerel (Atlantic-, horse mackerel etc), tuna, swordfish and barracudas all fall among the mackerel-like fish. Globally it is a very popular fish and forms an important source of food and income for many people. Mackerel are pelagic fish that live in large schools. While swimming in large schools, mackerel-like fish confuse their predators with the silver-like brilliance from their scales. Island mackerel is the smallest with 2o cm, the largest is the bluefin tuna that can reach a size of over 5 meters.

Yellowtail kingfish

Yellowtail kingfish is family of the jacks and jack mackerel and has some features that show similarities with tuna. Yellowtail kingfish occurs in deeper waters in the Southern Ocean near Australia, New-Zealand and South Africa. This species can get up to 180 cm long and weigh 90 kg. It is a well-known species in Japan. Since 2017, this species is also grown in aquaculture in Zeeland, the south of the Netherlands.

 

 

Yellowtail kingfish

Seriola lalandi
Origin

Indian Ocean, east (FAO 57)

Farming- / Catch method

Net pens/ Cages

  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Source usage
Impact on the environment
Management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

Yellowtail kingfish is farmed increasingly at more places. The young fish used for the aquaculture do not come from the wild. the farming in cages in the sea is not the most environmental friendly option due to fact that not eaten feed and waste come directly in the sea and diseases spread easily to and from wild fish. There is still relatively much wild fish needed for the farming of this fish: for 1 kg farmed fish about 4 kg wild fish is caught.

 

 

 

Yellowtail kingfish

Seriola lalandi
Origin

Pacific Ocean, south-west (FAO 81)

Farming- / Catch method

Handlines and pole-lines (hand operated)

  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

Yellowtail kingfish is a popular fish in New-Zealand, for both professional and recreational fishermen. Catches are being monitored, but the size of the stock is unknown.

The handline fishery is very selective with little bycatchBycatch:
Species caught next to species targeted for fishery. By-catches can consist of non-commercial species and species that are too small, and can be kept (this part is sometimes called by-product) or thrown back into the sea (discards). 
and no discardsDiscards:
Unwanted by-catch, which is thrown back because there is no quota, the market price is too low, or the fish is below the legal minimum landing size. Discards can be alive or dead.
. For this fishery baitfish are caught. The long-term consequences of catching baitfish are unclear but probably minimal. The fishery does no damage to vulnerable [habitats].

The management of this fishery in New-Zealand waters is partially effective.

 

Yellowtail kingfish

Seriola lalandi
Origin

Asia

Farming- / Catch method

Net pens/ Cages

  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Source usage
Impact on the environment
Management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

Yellowtail kingfish is farmed increasingly at more places. The young fish used for the aquaculture do not come from the wild. the farming in cages in the sea is not the most environmental friendly option due to fact that not eaten feed and waste come directly in the sea and diseases spread easily to and from wild fish. The management and feed used differs strongly between Asian countries and farms. At some farms industrial feed is used but there is also still feeding with locally caught small “trash fish”.

 

 

 

Yellowtail kingfish

Seriola lalandi
Origin

Pacific Ocean, south-west (FAO 81)

Farming- / Catch method

Bottom otter trawl, Set longlines, Gillnets

  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

Yellowtail kingfish is a popular fish in New-Zealand, for both professional and recreational fishermen. Catches are being monitored, but the size of the stock is unknown.

There is no focused fishery on this fish, but is a popular bycatch in several fisheries. In these fisheries there are several problems: in longline and gillnet fisheries there is bycatch of seabirds and dolphins. Trawling fisheries have bycatch of dolphins and besides that they do heavy damage to the bottom ecosystem.

The management of this fishery in New-Zealand waters is partially effective.

 

ASC label

Fish with the ASC label is farmed in a sustainable manner.

MSC label

Fish with the MSC label is caught sustainably.

Good fish

This fish is not being overfished or is being responsibly farmed, with minimal impact on the environment.

Second choice

This fish is a second choice. There are still some improvements to be made in this fishery or fish farm.

Avoid

Do not buy this fish. It's being overfished or the way it's farmed or caught has a negative impact on the environment.

By-catch

This fish is unwillingly caught while fishing for a different species. They are underused and should be eaten more.

GlobalG.A.P.

GlobalG.A.P. certified farms are doing a step in the right direction in terms of sustainability. A few species with this label are getting a better score on the VISwijzer.

Organic

Organic standards are the strictest when it comes to fish feed. They also require certain measures for animal well-being.