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Red/striped mullet

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/Keurmerk Wild
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Second choice
Avoid
Bycatch
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General

Mullets

Mullets are shy fish that prefer to live in schools. Their menus contain weeds and small, soil organisms. Mullets are included in a distinctive group, although they seem to have similarities to haring- and cod-like fish.  Mullets live in either tropical or temperate climate zones. Mullets have a preference for coastal waters and also occur in brackish waters. Mullets also live in rivers and lakes.

The maximum size of mullets can be 90cm although the average is between 40 and 55cm. Mullets have two dorsal fins, one is composed of four spines the second with shafts. The pelvic fin is composed of five shafts.

Red/striped mullet

Red and striped red mullet are found in the north-eastern Atlantic Ocean, from the British Isles in the north, to Dakar in the South. They are also found in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea. Due to rising sea water temperatures this species is found more and more commonly in the North Sea. In the southern North Sea and the English channel both mullets are found, but the striped red mullet is more abundant. Red mullet lives on the sea floor. Striped red mullet on sandy, muddy and rocky sea floors and can reach up to 40 cm. 

Red/striped mullet

Mullus barbatus, Mullus surmuletus
Origin

Atlantic Ocean, north-east (FAO 27)
Deelgebieden: North Sea, south

Farming- / Catch method

Scottish seining

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Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

There is not enough data on red mullet to do a good [stock estimation] of the stockStock:
The fish of a particular species reproducing in the same area in the same period. 
of mullet in the English Channel and the North Sea. Data from ICESICES:
International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, an international organization dedicated to research and advice for a sustainable use of the oceans. 
point towards a strong decline in the mullet stock, and advices to not let the [fishing pressure] increase anymore.

[Flyshoot] is considered to be a relatively selective fishery, with little bycatchBycatch:
Species caught next to species targeted for fishery. By-catches can consist of non-commercial species and species that are too small, and can be kept (this part is sometimes called by-product) or thrown back into the sea (discards). 
of undersizedUndersized fish:
Fish smaller than a prescribed minimum size. These sizes are determined per species and per country. For Europe, a minimum landing size applies to all EU Member States. 
fish. This is however strongly dependent on the target species, the [mesh size], the fishing area and the season. Bycatch of flyshoot fisheries in the English Channel and the North Sea can be substantial. Moreover, the bottom fisheries in this area are known for their bycatch of rays and sharks, which are very vulnerable to fishing pressure. It is therefore not excluded that these will also be caught in this fishery.

The English Channel and the North Sea are under the EU fishing policy. There are however no specific fishery measures for mullet. Now that the fishery on mullet has increased, there needs to be a management plan soon. However, the lack of data makes the development of an effective management plan very difficult.

Red/striped mullet

Mullus barbatus, Mullus surmuletus
Origin

Atlantic Ocean, north-east (FAO 27)
Deelgebieden: North Sea, south

Farming- / Catch method

Bottom otter trawl

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Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

A full and quantified [stock estimate] for mullet is not available due to a lack of catch data and biological knowledge of the species. Data of ICESICES:
International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, an international organization dedicated to research and advice for a sustainable use of the oceans. 
however point towards a strong decline of the stock of mullet in the past two years, partly by an increased fishing pressure on juveniles. Since 2014 structurally more mullet than advised by ICESICES:
International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, an international organization dedicated to research and advice for a sustainable use of the oceans. 
is caught.

Mullet is caught with a [bottom otter trawl]. The type of net that is used is more selective than the traditional [beamtrawl], with less bycatchBycatch:
Species caught next to species targeted for fishery. By-catches can consist of non-commercial species and species that are too small, and can be kept (this part is sometimes called by-product) or thrown back into the sea (discards). 
of [undersized fish] and unwanted species. However, the bycatch and discarding of unwanted catch is still a problem, especially the bycatch of sharks and rays. These species are vulnerable to [fishing pressure] and many populations are under pressure. The fishing with bottom otter trawls also impacts the seabed and is a direct disturbance of the bottom life. Intensive fishing with bottom otter trawl leads on the long term to a change in the species composition.

There are no specific fishery measures for mullet. There is no [catch limit] and no minimum [landing size]. It falls however under the EU [Common Fishing Policy]. Now that the fishery on mullet has increased, there needs to be a management plan soon. However, the lack of data makes the development of an effective management plan very difficult.

 

Red/striped mullet

Mullus barbatus, Mullus surmuletus
Origin

Mediterranean (FAO 37)

Farming- / Catch method

Bottom otter trawl

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Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

Catch data of mullet in the Mediterranean are barely available and a full picture of the state of the stock can only be formed for a few area’s. These point toward overfishing.

Bottom otter trawl fishery on mullet is an [unselective fishing method]. This fishery has commonly high bycatchBycatch:
Species caught next to species targeted for fishery. By-catches can consist of non-commercial species and species that are too small, and can be kept (this part is sometimes called by-product) or thrown back into the sea (discards). 
of [undersized fish] and [unwanted species]. A large part of this bycatch is thrown back into sea as discardsDiscards:
Unwanted by-catch, which is thrown back because there is no quota, the market price is too low, or the fish is below the legal minimum landing size. Discards can be alive or dead.
. Dependent on the target species, this discard percentage is 20-70% of the total catch. The survivability of these discards is very low. The fishing with bottom otter trawls also impacts the seabed and is a direct disturbance of the bottom life. Intensive fishing with beam trawl leads on the long term to a change in the species composition in sea.

The fishery on mullet is not managed. There are no [catch restrictions] for mullet and only a few countries have a minimum [landing size].

Red/striped mullet

Mullus barbatus, Mullus surmuletus
Origin

Mediterranean (FAO 37)

Farming- / Catch method

Gillnets

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Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

Catch data of mullet in the Mediterranean are barely available and a full picture of the state of the stock can only be formed for a few area’s. These point toward overfishing.

Mullet is caught in a mixed gillnet fishery. A problem in this fishery is the (incidental) bycatchBycatch:
Species caught next to species targeted for fishery. By-catches can consist of non-commercial species and species that are too small, and can be kept (this part is sometimes called by-product) or thrown back into the sea (discards). 
of vulnerable, endangered and protected species like sharks, small cetaceans, rays, sea turtles and sawfish. The sawfish appears as “critically endangered” on the red list of the IUCNIUCN:
International Union for the Conservation of Nature, an international institute for nature and natural resources. It is a partnership with both non-governmental organizations and governments. 
and bycatch of this species is a large threat to the survival of this species. Another bycatch is the endangered seabream.

The fishery on mullet is not managed. There are no [catch restrictions] for mullet and only a few countries have a minimum [landing size].

Red/striped mullet

Mullus barbatus, Mullus surmuletus
Origin

Atlantic Ocean, north-east (FAO 27)
Deelgebieden: North Sea, south

Farming- / Catch method

Beam trawl

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  • Feb
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  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Fish stocks and fishing pressure
Ecosystem effects
Fishery management
Final assessment
Explanation assessment

A full and quantified [stock estimate] for mullet is not available due to a lack of catch data and biological knowledge of the species. Data of ICESICES:
International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, an international organization dedicated to research and advice for a sustainable use of the oceans. 
however point towards a strong decline of the stock of mullet in the past two years, partly by an increased fishing pressure on juveniles. Since 2014 structurally more mullet than advised by ICESICES:
International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, an international organization dedicated to research and advice for a sustainable use of the oceans. 
is caught.

Mullet caught with a [beam trawl] has high bycatch of [undersized fish] and unwanted species. A large part of this bycatch is discarded, this can be 14-69% of the total catch. The survivability of these discards is very low. The bottom trawl fishery is known for their bycatch of sharks and rays. These species are vulnerable to [fishing pressure] and many populations are under pressure. The fishing with bottom otter trawls also impacts the seabed and is a direct disturbance of the bottom life. Intensive fishing with beam trawl leads on the long term to a change in the species composition.

There are no specific fishery measures for mullet. There is no [catch limit] and no minimum [landing size]. It falls however under the EU [Common Fishing Policy]. Now that the fishery on mullet has increased, there needs to be a management plan soon. However, the lack of data makes the development of an effective management plan very difficult.

ASC label

Fish with the ASC label is farmed in a sustainable manner.

MSC label

Fish with the MSC label is caught sustainably.

Good fish

This fish is not being overfished or is being responsibly farmed, with minimal impact on the environment.

Second choice

This fish is a second choice. There are still some improvements to be made in this fishery or fish farm.

Avoid

Do not buy this fish. It's being overfished or the way it's farmed or caught has a negative impact on the environment.

By-catch

This fish is unwillingly caught while fishing for a different species. They are underused and should be eaten more.

GlobalG.A.P.

GlobalG.A.P. certified farms are doing a step in the right direction in terms of sustainability. A few species with this label are getting a better score on the VISwijzer.

Organic

Organic standards are the strictest when it comes to fish feed. They also require certain measures for animal well-being.

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