More information

Lumpfish

Quality mark Cultivation
/Keurmerk Wild
Green
Second choice
Avoid
Bycatch
Informatie over vissoort
Lees meer
General

Scorpaenidae

Scorpaenidae (also known as scorpionfish) is a family of marine fish that includes many of the most venomous species. It is in the name, scorpionfish have a type of spike or sting that contains a type of venomous slimy substance. Physical characteristics of this type of fish are the compact body, many spikes on head and back and a relatively large mouth. They are widespread in tropical and temperate waters. Most subspecies live at the bottom of the sea and feed with shellfish and little fish. Scorpionfish make use of suction, generated by the oral cavity, to catch their prey.

The most well-known species in the Northesa are gurnards and redfish. The lionfish is also a scorpionfish.

 

Lumpfish

The lumpfish or lumpsucker has a very special appearance. This species has a roundshaped body form with bumps on its back and sides. The pelvic fins of the lumpfish form suction discs which they use to attach firmly to rocks and other surfaces. The spawning season is in early spring and when they are ready to spawn, males turn red or purple and females get a blue-greenish colour. They lay their eggs in shallow waters that are guarded by the males. Lumpfish can get up to 61 cm long and weigh 9,5 kg. They feed on jellyfish, small crustaceans, fish eggs and zooplankton. They can be found in the Atlantic Ocean, North Sea and Baltic Sea. Lumpfish are targeted by fisheries for their eggs that are sold as a cheaper alternative for sturgeon caviar.

 

Lumpfish

Cyclopterus lumpus
Origin

Atlantic Ocean, north-east (FAO 27)
Deelgebieden: Greenland (west)

Farming- / Catch method

Gillnets

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Explanation assessment

Around Iceland and Greenland there are MSC-certifiedMSC Certified:
Fisheries that comply with the Marine Stewardship Council assessment criteria and are certified. Fish products with the blue MSC label are caught by sustainable fisheries.
fisheries fishing on lumpfish. The fishery with gillnets does little damage. The lumpfish are caught for their eggs, which are sold as caviar.

 

Lumpfish

Cyclopterus lumpus
Origin

Atlantic Ocean, north-east (FAO 27)
Deelgebieden: Skagerrak and Kattegat

Farming- / Catch method

Anchored gillnets, Gillnets

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Explanation assessment

Lumpfish are caught predominantly for their valuable roe, which is sold as imitation caviar. This is why females are the main target of this fishery, which makes this species vulnerable to fishing pressure.

Gillnet fishery does little to no damage to the seafloor. There is a risk of bycatch of endangered species like sharks, rays, sea mammals and sea birds. Bycatch can reach levels of 20% of total catch.

There is no specific management of lumpfish fishery, common gillnet fishery management in FAO 27 is reasonably effective.

 

ASC label

Fish with the ASC label is farmed in a sustainable manner.

MSC label

Fish with the MSC label is caught sustainably.

Good fish

This fish is not being overfished or is being responsibly farmed, with minimal impact on the environment.

Second choice

This fish is a second choice. There are still some improvements to be made in this fishery or fish farm.

Avoid

Do not buy this fish. It's being overfished or the way it's farmed or caught has a negative impact on the environment.

By-catch

This fish is unwillingly caught while fishing for a different species. They are underused and should be eaten more.

GlobalG.A.P.

GlobalG.A.P. certified farms are doing a step in the right direction in terms of sustainability. A few species with this label are getting a better score on the VISwijzer.

Organic

Organic standards are the strictest when it comes to fish feed. They also require certain measures for animal well-being.